WAMA Logo- Wildlife Art Museum of Australia. Wildlife, botanic, natural history gallery and botanic gardens WAMA Header- Wildlife Art Museum of Australia. Wildlife, botanic, natural history gallery and botanic gardens
7

Welcome from the Patron
........................................
The Wildlife Art Museum of Australia
........................................
Vision and Objectives
........................................
Milestones
........................................
Regional Impact
........................................
Economic and Social Impact Study
........................................
Museum and
Landscape Design

........................................
Proposed Design
........................................
Partnerships
........................................
Business Principles
........................................
The WAMA Community Engagement Model
........................................
Capital Funding Strategy
........................................
The Foundation Organisation Structure
&
The Core Team
........................................
Meet the Team
........................................
Achieving Our Vision
........................................
Supporting the Foundation
........................................
Contact Information
........................................
Acknowledgements
........................................
.

WILDLIFE ART HAS BEEN FEATURED IN THE HUMAN PSYCHE SINCE THE VERY BEGINNING, WHEN
EARLY MAN PAINTED THE ANIMALS HE HUNTED ON THE WALLS OF HIS CAVE DWELLINGS, OR CARVED THEIR FORM ON THE ROCKS AROUND HIM.

WAMA celebrates the relationship between art and science. WAMA- Wildlife Art Museum of Australia. Wildlife, botanic, natural history gallery and botanic gardens.

There is no major, dedicated institution anywhere in Australia that celebrates the relationship between art, science and nature, and its role in awakening us to the world in which we live. As our awareness of the natural world develops and the importance of wildlife art is internationally recognised, natural history artworks are being seen as an important part of our cultural record.

WAMA will give a home to these works so they can be publicly displayed and appreciated on a permanent basis.

The WAMA site is in the Northern Grampians Shire bordering the Grampians National Park. On the slopes of the sandstone ranges, in the gullies, valleys and surrounds, there are several distinctive environments each harbouring rare, natural

treasures. Cave art, artefacts and sites sacred to our earliest known inhabitants can also be found. When fully realised, WAMA will be an arts and environment precinct like no other in Australia. It will become a must-see attraction to complement the ecotourism experience of the Grampians environment.

WAMA Artist Supporters Works. WAMA- Wildlife Art Museum of Australia. Wildlife, botanic, natural history gallery and botanic gardens. “WINGS OF STRENGTH” NATURAL AND MULTI -MEDIA PAINTING BY SOPHIE CAPE. “COURTING SQUID” LINOPRINT BY SILVIO APPONYI. “BREGA-WEDGETAILE D EAGLE” CHARCOAL ENGRAVING BY STEVE MORVELL
LEFT TO RIGHT: “WINGS OF STRENGTH” NATURAL AND MULTI -MEDIA PAINTING BY SOPHIE CAPE ©
“COURTING SQUID” LINOPRINT BY SILVIO APPONYI ©
“BREGA-WEDGETAILE D EAGLE” CHARCOAL ENGRAVING BY STEVE MORVELL ©
Australia has played a pivotal role in the discovery, exploration and attempted explanation of the environment that has nurtured the human race for millions of years.
In Europe in the early 18th century, the burgeoning printing industry found the public had an insatiable appetite for stories of exploration and adventure but, in a largely illiterate world, it was pictures rather than words that excited the majority. It was in this era that the dilettante ‘naturalist’ and ‘natural history artist’ emerged.  Scientific, geological and botanical societies, often with ‘Royal Patronage’ sprang up across Europe and exploratory expeditions rarely sailed without a scientific contingent and their artists.

The ‘Endeavour’, under the command of Captain James Cook with botanist Joseph Banks and artist Alexander Buchan on board, landed on Australian shores at Botany Bay on the 29th April 1770. What they discovered would ultimately challenge humanity’s perception of its very existence. This was a land full of unrecognisable trees, unknown flowers and animals that challenged belief. In 1836, the famous exploratory survey vessel, the ‘HMS Beagle’ landed in Australia with ‘gentleman naturalist’ Charles Darwin and artist Conrad Martens aboard. Darwin’s studies of the unique life on the isolated Galapagos Islands had already planted the seeds of a scandalous idea of natural selection, and what he found in Australia only served as confirmation. Then in 1838, drawn by the reports of the fantastic birds and animals being discovered, John and Elizabeth Gould travelled to Australia.Between 1840 and 1848, Gould published his ‘Birds of Australia’ and in 1859, to an outraged public, Charles Darwin published ‘The Origin of Species’. Gould began publishing his ‘Mammals of Australia’ in 1863.
The curiosity of a handful of scientists and the discovery of a unique continent opened the eyes of scholars but it was the printing press and the work of artists that brought these discoveries into the lives of the vast majority of the world’s population. Millennia-old beliefs were upended and challenged and the thirst for further knowledge prevailed and still continues.

© WAMA. Foundation Ltd ABN 23 158 710 411. Web site: Stephen Powell.