Mike Maka and Conrad Bizjak WAMA Mural

NATURE-INSPIRED ART MURALS, SET THE SCENE FOR THE FUTURE OF WAMA

Visual artists Mike Maka and Conrad Bizjak recently visited WAMA to paint 2 building murals inspired by the natural surroundings of the Grampians National Park (Gariwerd), complimenting the regions silo art tourism trail.

The artists were commissioned to paint 2 equipment buildings featuring nature-inspired art including Australian native flora and fauna that are indicative of the future of WAMA, to provide a nature-inspired art precinct that will boast a dedicated art gallery, learning and education spaces surrounded by botanic gardens and wetlands that nurtures and protects rare species of plants and animals.

“We are thrilled and excited that both Mike and Conrad have created these stunning murals on the WAMA site.” said Glenda Lewin, Patron, WAMA Foundation.   

“These murals represent the important interconnection between art, the natural environment, and set the scene of what is to come in the near future for WAMA. 

“They will also be a wonderful local adjunct to the regions silo art trail that has gained much momentum in the past years, and we are excited to bring a piece of that here to WAMA and the Grampians.”

The artist’s inspiration was drawn from spending time exploring the Grampians, talking to local botanists and wildlife experts in preparation and research for the murals. 

“For this mural I’ve aimed to represent some of the beauty of the natural surroundings of the Grampians region” said Artist, Mike Maka.

“Some of the photos I’ve used for reference I’ve either taken myself while hiking, in the garden of a local botanist or supplied to me by a local nature photography enthusiast John Tiddy.  I’ve used John’s photos as reference for the Brown Tree Frog and the two birds: the Welcome Swallow and the Wedge Tail Eagle also known as Bunjil the Creator, which I understand is of strong significance to many Traditional Owners around Victoria and the local indigenous groups of the area, that I wanted to pay respect to.”

“A huge thanks to the WAMA team and I’m looking forward to seeing the place transform over time.”

Stage One of the murals has taken five days to paint using a mixture of acrylic with brush and aerosol.

Mike Maka is a Melbourne based visual artist who works in a variety of media, mainly on walls, buildings and street art.

Some of Mike’s recent works include being involved in the Australian Silo Art Trail, this year’s Australian Open Tennis and various nature-based street and wall art working both nationally and internationally.